Category Archives: Dallas Restaurants

Meals on Wheels: The Original Door Dash

Meals awaiting delivery

In August 2019, People Newspapers published my story about Meals on Wheels.  I have the honor of serving on the VNA/Meals on Wheels Board of Directors and wanted a way to promote our Drive Away Hunger campaign. My idea was to “review” the meals eaten by more than 4,500 Dallas residents who receive Meals on Wheels (MOW) daily.  The reaction I got from folks when I told them I was going to eat MOW for a week was pity, curiosity and, in some cases, borderline disgust.  I was undeterred.

In August of this year, I learned that my article on Meals on Wheels earned third place in the National Association of Newspapers Buster Awards for Best Feature.  I’m delighted to share this article and you can also follow this link to read the version that ran in People Newspapers.  

“Hello, my name is Elaine*. I just want to let you know that my mother really enjoyed it her meal Friday.  It was the Honey-glazed Turkey with Au Gratin Potatoes and Brussels Sprouts and she told me over and over how delicious it was and to be sure and tell the chef how much she appreciated it. Though we didn’t know it at the time, that was mom’s last Meals on Wheels delivery. She succumbed to cancer two days later. I wanted to be sure to pass along her ‘compliments to the chef’ and to say thanks to Meals on Wheels for being my mom’s lifeline for so long.”

Between Pinterest boards filled with edible works of art to “instagramworthy” meals to “food porn,” thanks to technology, food has been objectified to the point in which many of us have practically forgotten its value. I get it – my “phone eats first” and I can spend 10 minutes trying to get the perfect Instapic of shards of Maldon Sea Salt artfully arranged on a juicy red tomato. I have a healthy preoccupation with food and feel lucky to be able to write about it for this paper. This month, I’m not going to feature a new restaurant, I’m going to feature an old one: Meals on Wheels Dallas County which is about 40 years old.

Meals on Wheels is the original Door Dash with employees and volunteers canvassing the Dallas area Monday through Friday to deliver meals to 4,500 clients for whom their daily delivery of food, a friendly face and a kind word is a lifeline. Many MOW clients have health issues so providing nutritious, balanced meals on such a large scale and tight budget is challenging. If you’re reading this in a newspaper that was delivered to your home, chances are you live in an affluent area and are unlikely to be food insecure.  But have you ever wondered about what kind of food is prepared and delivered on such a large scale five days a week?  Maybe not but I hope you do, if just this once.

With the help of Dr. Ashley Lind, the VP of Meals on Wheels and Population Health, I ate four meals to gain insight into the value of Meals on Wheels to homebound seniors. It was an eye-opening experience, not because the food was especially good or especially bad, but because it allowed me to appreciate food in a way I haven’t in years.

Monday: Swiss Steak with Whipped Potatoes and Italian Green Beans

I approached the first meal as a novelty. The ground beef patty was juicy and flavored well with hint of sautéed onion. All meals must be low sodium, so the whipped potatoes and green beans tasted like not much until I added salt. Everything had good texture.

Tuesday: King Ranch Chicken with Steamed Broccoli and Carrots

The King Ranch Chicken was really tasty! It was a little spicy, in fact, and had big chunks of white-meat chicken in a cheesy sauce. The broccoli and carrots were cooked but not mushy and needed salt.  Without realizing it, I ate the entire meal in four minutes. As I walked out of the VNA Haggarty Center, it occurred to me that I inhaled that meal as if I was just checking a box and not feeding my body and soul. I started to cry as I walked to my car.

Wednesday: Turkey Tetrazzini with Brussels Sprouts and Vegetable Medley

My favorite meal so far, the pasta with chunks of tender turkey meat was full of flavor with a hint of spice. I wondered how they can make 4,500 plates of pasta and have it not become mush. Honestly, I didn’t eat the Brussels Sprouts. I’m sorry mom, I never liked them.

Thursday: Homestyle Meatloaf with Garlic Mashed Potatoes and

Herbed Green Beans

I think the Meatloaf is about the same as the Swiss Steak but with more tomato and seasoning. The meatloaf was tender but not mushy, the green beans were cooked just right with a little snap left in them and more flavorful than previous vegetable offerings. The mashed potatoes only had a hint of garlic and when I finished the trapezoid-shaped mound, I realized I hadn’t eaten mashed potatoes since last Thanksgiving, and I’d eaten them twice this week.  “How ironic, I thought.”

I’m so fortunate, most of us are, to afford high-quality food and spent time and money dining out with our friends. We can order what we want; throw out what we don’t. We have so many choices, too many sometimes, on what and where to eat. We can celebrate food with photos and hashtags and beautiful creations made from watermelon and a paring knife  – and we should! I hope, too, that we will be aware of those who are food insecure, lonely and rely on that daily delivery of Meals on Wheels as one of their few remaining connections to socialization, sensorial pleasure and nourishment for their bodies.

I say I’m not a critic, I’m a storyteller but I’ll summarize the meals this way: They’re better than airplane food, WAY better than the Frank Crowley Courts Building Cafeteria you’re stuck with for jury duty and better than starving, which is the alternative to Meals on Wheels delivery.

A Rosé is a Rosé is a Rosé

Smith Story Rose and a Texas Sunset

Blush, summer water, pink wine. It can be syrupy sweet, acidic and bright, fruity and vaguely effervescent, and bold but thin. It has become the omnipresent social accessory of summer for its refreshingly crisp taste that literally makes your mouth water and its ability to match summer outfits perfectly. Though often regarded as a “chick drink” because of its slightly effeminate tones ranging from pale pink to a translucent cherry red, there is no data to support that stereotype.  It really depends on individual tastes, and with ten different styles of rosé, there is enough range to satisfy nearly every palate. Good rosés can be had for less than $10 a bottle and there are many great rosés priced below $30 a bottle.

This Saturday, June 13, is National Rosé Day, always the second Saturday in June, the perfect time for a cold, crisp mostly low alcohol wine to enjoy on a toasty day. In honor of rosé day and several Dallas area restaurants have created specials to honor the occasion, but first, a history lesson.

Rosé wine is thought to have been created around 8,000 years ago in Armenia where clay jars with wine residue were found.  Back then, wines would have been lighter since the more advanced pressing and fermentation techniques that make red and white wines weren’t developed yet.  Some rosé is produced when black-skinned grapes are crushed and the skin maintains contact with the juice for around 24 hours, versus the skins immediately being filtered out for white wine or left in contact with the juice for long periods of time as with red wines.

In the past three years at least, rosé sales have been increasing around 40% each year, with the main source of rosé wines coming to America from France, Spain and Italy, though American rosés compare very favorably to Old World wines.  My favorite American rosé is from local gal Alison Smith Story, a Keller native and Baylor grad who started Smith Story wines with her husband, Eric.  They make only one, a Rosé of Pinot Noir Rheingau Germany which is bright and delicately fruity. I also love La Vielle Ferme (also known as “chicken wine”) which is in the style of Provence, a combination of granache, syrah and cinsault grapes making it a little tart, a little sweet and a little fruity, a great blend and an exceptional value at around $9 per bottle.

Foxtrot Market in University Park and Uptown have great rosé choices

How do you know which rosés you will like? Try them.  Rebecca Murphy, Wine Writer, Professional Wine Judge and Founder of The Dallas Morning News and TexSom Wine Competition (and is also considered to be the first female Sommelier in Texas), offers this advice, “I love rosés from Provence, but they are so popular that winemakers from other regions are going to great lengths to get that Provence pale pink. So, my first thought is to avoid selecting a rosé just because of its color.  Instead, pick a one from a grape you really like (like you).  Or from a region or country that makes wines you like. It wasn’t that many years ago that a rosé drinker was considered an unsophisticated rube.  Today, we are living in rosé heaven with a whole world to choose from.  Have fun exploring.” You can explore with minimal financial risk at Central Market, World Market or Foxtrot Market which have abundant selections.

Whichever rosé makes your day, as always, drink responsibly. For a few unique approaches to National Rosé Day, check out these cocktails and frozen drinks made from rosé.

Happy National Rosé Day, here’s to your health!

National Rosé Day Specials in Dallas

Blueberry Souffle and Rosé at Rise no. 1

Rise no. 1 has a beautiful selection of French rosés of different styles which are perfect to pair with savory and sweet dishes, including their seasonal Blueberry Soufflé.

Young & Beautiful at Knife

Knife at The Highlands Dallas has created a refreshing rosé-based cocktail called the Young & Beautiful, named after the famous Lana Del Rey song from 2013. The drink combines Rose Gold Provençal Rosé Dashfire Hibiscus Bitters, Fever Tree Soda and a Hibiscus Flower which can and should be enjoyed on Knife’s patio.

JAXON Texas Kitchen & Beer Garden has created a summer-inspired twist on the traditional frosé cocktail with a Fresh Watermelon Frozé , the perfect pairing for JAXON’s massive patio.

Malibu Poke always has rosé and frosé on the menu but Saturday you can enjoy $1 rosé all day while you’re partaking poke.

Poke and rosé sort of rhyme

Dreaming of The Charles

Song Pairing: A Million Dreams from The Greatest Showman

The Charles

The steady hum of much needed interpersonal connection filled the space, the occasional percussive beats of laughter punctuated the atmosphere, then quieted, leaving a brief pause for me to hear the background music. It was reopening night at The Charles after its closure on March 16. Preshift earlier that day was electric, J stayed in the kitchen, head down and focused while Chas, emotionally charged and energetic as ever, recounted the difficulties of the past few weeks. He told this family of employees, whom he and his partners had been paying since Day 1 of the shutdown, that he missed them, even though he’d regularly video chatted with them during the shutdown. He took a moment to swallow the emotion that swelled in his throat. Chas looked at every staff member in the room as if he were trying to imprint this moment and their expressions into his memory forever and told them how happy he is to share this space once again with them. They all nodded in agreement, shifting back and forth on their feet like racehorses in their starting gates, ready for service to begin. Chas then took a sip of Drappier, put his glass down, and flew up his arms to signal the rise of the golden-tasseled red velvet curtain. “It’s showtime!”      And then I woke up, my dream about The Charles ended before I could even order.

Throughout the pandemic, I’ve had vivid dreams, many of which couldn’t be explained by the even the best psychoanalysts.  This dream wasn’t hard to decipher, though. I’ve been distancing in my dreams to places I would rather be, and a frequent theme is restaurants. I visited Bar Charles in December the day it opened and managed to squeeze into their reservation book for an early dinner in January.  I’ve since dreamt about The Charles and the Lemon Ricotta Gnudi and Veal Ragu Capelloni which compelled me to call Chas and find out how he’s doing and when The Charles might reopen. After we spoke, I had what I now refer to as “The Greatest Showman Dream” about the reopening.

The Charles celebrated its two-year anniversary May 1, not as they had wished, surely, but still optimistic that they would soon be able to open the dining room. Since late March, The Charles has served lunch and dinner for curbside pick-up and delivery via Alto and has opened their more than “Italian’ish” wine list for sale at attractive discounts. Recognizing that the well-healed crowd The Charles attracts appreciates great wine, Chas stocked up on impressive wines to add to the collection right before the pandemic decimated the hospitality industry. If he had known in January what he learned in March, he admits he would not have amplified his cellar to such an extent. Like other restaurants, The Charles is selling from its cellar to keep cash flow going, while still quite certain that when it reopens, $399 bottles of Tenuta San Guido Sassicaia (yum) will be ordered by eager and appreciative guests. For now, The Charles is selling bottles of wine under $250 at 50% discount and those over $250 at 40% discount.  If you price shop, you’ll recognize this as a very good buying opportunity.

J Chastain, Chef and Chas Martin, Owner of The Charles

J Chastain is an introvert, the complete opposite of Chas they both confessed.  J’s pedigree cooking in some of the most respected, if not chaotic, kitchens in Dallas proves his creativity, execution, and endurance.  He misses his team and the energy of the kitchen, he told me, but he’s rather enjoyed this relative downtime. He’s at the restaurant near daily, doing or overseeing maintenance and repairs of the equipment and space which was new construction, custom built but driven like a Ferrari on the Autostrada since its opening in 2018.  J feels fortunate to work for Chas Martin and the See brothers, Ross and Corbin. Prior to The Charles opening, they sent J to Italy to research, study, eat and drink to live la dolce vida, capture it like a firefly and release it within 1632 Market Center Drive. “They have vision,” he says of the owners and will accomplish great things in the future.  For now, though he isn’t a chef who works the dining room, touching tables, preferring to stay in his groove behind the scenes, he recognizes the challenges the restaurant, like all, will face when it reopens.

The Charles

When The Charles reopens, Chas and J wonder what the new normal will look like.  The restaurant is a compact 2700 square-feet.  The tables are close together by design, the long bar is set with tall chairs lined up for hip-to-hip seating while a row of two top tables sit only two feet away. It’s tight by design, sexy and energetic, intimate in a very public, voyeuristic kind of way. How will this work when you increase space between tables and reduce the number of bodies in there?  How do you articulate luxury with paper menus and silverware condoms? It won’t be easy but the stylish, positive, intuitive showman, Chas Martin, will figure it out.

Dallas is still a strong, viable restaurant market and destination city.  The Charles’ ownership group is bullish on the city and their ability to provide unique dining experiences for their clientele.  They are patient and measured, smart investors who are playing the long game and, in fact, invested back in The Charles for 21 months before making a distribution to investors.  They are currently at work developing new concepts which they are quite secretive about, but I will venture to guess that they could move into something textural and moderately exotic, such as Mediterranean-ish, to feature the bright cuisine of the region, beyond pita and hummus, and introduce local diners to the exciting wines of Israel, Lebanon and Greece.

Ross See, Chas Martin and Corbin See, owners of The Charles

Until The Charles reopens the dining room, I will order and pick up the polenta fries, spicy creste di Gallo and a bottle of one of their Sicilian white wines (at 50% off, remember).  I will distance in my dreams; I’ll visit The Charles and my other favorite restaurants in town.  In my dreams I’ll walk a clean, empty Venice, the canals clear and odorless; I’ll spend hours in the Victoria & Albert in London with no pushy queues forcing me to abandon the exhibits I want study for hours; my dreams will take me to sunrise over Angkor Wat with only those closest to me alongside.  I will dream a million dreams, the same as Chas Martin.

Feed Your Mama Right on Mother’s Day

Being a mother and step mother is the hardest yet

most rewarding thing in life.

Traveling with these three is never dull
Traveling with these three is never dull.

Sunday is Mother’s Day, another great reason to celebrate in the month of May.  Whether you are a mom, have a mom, are married to a mom or just appreciate the strength of maternal bonds and the role that motherhood plays into shaping our society, let’s lift up mothers with great food, quality time together and by demonstrating appreciation for mothers everywhere. (Can you tell I’m trying to send a message to people I’m related to?)

These restaurants are offering curbside pick up and delivery so you can treat mom at home.

Homewood has a fabulous menu for pick up. Please order by end of day Thursday and plan to pick up at Homewood between 11 am and 1 pm Sunday. To order, call 214.434.1244 or info@homewooddallas.com minimum order for two is required. Menu: Choose one Strada: Nduja, swiss chard and ricotta or Mushrooms, asparagus, and feta; then, pick a spread: House cured Lox with the works or cured country ham with cultured butter and Calabrian chile cheese spread. Side dishes included are Greens with toasted seeds & herbs with mustard vinaigrette, bread and butter carrots, smashed cucumber salad and deviled eggs. Finish up with Maggie’s pound cake with macerated strawberries and mascarpone cream. $65 per person.

Al Biernet’s Roast Chicken Photo by Gustav Schmiege

Al Biernat’s offers curbside pick-up as well. Please place orders by 4 pm Friday, May 8. To order and schedule your pick up time, call 214.209.2201 or order via al biernets website. Orders will be available for pickup between 12:30pm-7pm on Sunday, May 10th. Al’s doesn’t everything well and Sunday’s menu includes some of the restaurant’s most popular menu items including Al’s salad, prime rib, grilled salmon, herb roasted chicken shown here and sides such as chopped salad, creamed corn, or lobster risotto. For kiddos, the menu also includes chicken fingers, noodles with butter or marinara, plain hamburgers. Dessert options include coconut pie, Texas pecan pie, NY style cheesecake.

Lobster Salad from Georgie

Georgie by Curtis Stone offers a fancy brunch with so many fabulous items from which to choose.  To order, call 469.466.8263 or go online here. Place your order and choose your delivery or pick up time from the available options.  Delivery is free within a two-mile radius of the Knox Henderson restaurant. The three-course meal for adults offers a starter, main and dessert choice for $50 per person. Children’s meals are $25 per person and include an entrée and dessert. Starter options include the choice of a Pastry Basket (best croissants!), White Asparagus Mimosa, Grilled Artichoke Salad, Tomato Gazpacho Crab & Avocado Salad. Entrée choices include Le Bilboquet’s famous Cajun Chicken and Lobster Salad shown here, Mango Grilled Halibut and beef options including Petit Filet au Poivre. Dessert choices are Chocolate Mousse, Strawberry shortcake and Keylime Pie.

Stock & Barrel offers curbside pick-up and delivery daily, on Sunday, though, pick-up hours are from 9 am to 1 pm. Orders must be placed by Friday at 9 pm. To place an order and set pick-up time between 9 am and 1 pm, call 214.888.0150.  The dinner for two menu offers a choice of Goat cheese dumplings with asparagus, green garlic, braised little gems, fava beans and tarragon or Cherry wood smoked range chicken with red onion marmalade or Wagyu meatloaf with green peppercorn butter. Dinner for four menu options include those choices plus sides including assorted grains with lemon, zucchini, fennel, pistachios, black currants, and herbs; cheesy polenta; mesclun greens with toasted pecans, clementines, feta, and a marmalade vinaigrette. Dessert is their famous sticky toffee pudding. Take the guess work out and let them pair your wines and cocktails for you.  Dinner for two is $75, dinner for four is $125.

Salum’s Mother’s Day take away special is perfectly on-brand for Salum with little Mediterranean twists to every dish. Order online by Friday at 5 pm for Sunday pick up between 10 am and noon. The four-course menu is offered for $65 per person plus tax and gratuity. Appetizers are Leek, spinach, goat cheese phyllo dough rolls (I’d love to see how Abri does that!, phyllo is so hard to work with!) served with spiced berry jam. Salad course is a Little Gem lettuce salad with English peas, grilled corn and heirloom tomatoes with a mint basil marinated burrata and you have a choice of three entrees: 1) Beef rib roast with mushroom saute and red onion horseradish compote; 2) Blood orange or rosemary crusted Cornish hen; or 3) Pan seared halibut with lemony crab topping and tarragon vinaigrette. The menu includes sides of baked potato, Brussels Sprouts, bacon and sage with aged cheddar and grilled spring vegetables with spiced walnut relish and dessert of a strawberry, apple and ginger cobbler with Henry’s Homemade Sweet Cream ice cream. Woah, that all sounds so good. Salum also sells wine and cocktail kits so ask for the perfect pairings for your feast.

Parigi has perfected curbside pick-up.  Please place orders by Thursday May 7 at 5 pm by calling 214.521.0295 and ask for Janice or Allison or email your order at orders@parigidallas.com.  When you place your order, tell you server whether it is for pick-up or delivery, for Saturday or Sunday and if you want Ready to EAT or Ready to HEAT. In addition to this fantastic Mother’s Day menu, Parigi will also offer its usual curbside menu.

Mother’s Day brunch menu includes individual mushroom-leek-gruyere quiches, chicken and poblano stuffed crepes, polenta blueberry pancakes, chocolate chip bread pudding French toast and bites for the kids including chicken tenders and spaghetti and meatballs. Parigi is offering desserts from local legends including Mynetta’s strawberry cake, JR’s individual blueberry pie and Henry’s ice cream in a variety of flavors. Brunch isn’t brunch without Mimosas or Bloody Mary’s so add one of Parigi’s drink kits to go.

Sachet has been dark since this whole crazy thing started but it’s reopening for curbside pick up and delivery for Mother’s Day. Hooray! The Mother’s Day meals are heat and eat (or cool and drool) and should be ordered now so you can arrange pick up on Friday between 2 pm and 7 pm and Saturday between noon and 7 pm. Order by calling 214.613.6425 or emailing reservations@sachetdallas.com. The meal is served Family Style and serves four at $45 per person. The offerings include: Choice of three Mezes, a choice of salad, choice of two entrees, two sides and an assortment of desserts. To read the full menu in all its glory, click here.

Jon Alexis clearly loves mothers, look at this feast.

TJ’s Seafood Market’s Preston Royal location is offering a sweet brunch for pick-up that feeds four-six people for $110.  To order, call 214.691.2369  by Friday, May 8. The menu features a Ham & Cheese egg casserole, TJ’s famous shrimp cocktail, cinnamon rolls with cream cheese icing, Caesar salad, bacon and breakfast potatoes.  You can add a Mimosa package for $25.

Festa della Mamma at Il Bracco

Il Bracco, The Plaza at Preston Center’s Italian restaurant from CEO Robert Quick, an SMU grad and former omelet guy at Dallas Country Club, serves up fantastic Italian fare and executes to-go perfectly. The Festa della Mamma menu must be ordered by Friday, May 8 and is available to curbside pick-up or delivery via Alto. Full menu is HERE and is also available please email you order to parkcities@ilbraccorestaurant.com. The special menu feeds four people for $100, a great deal, if you ask me.  The menu starts with a Chilled Carrot Soup, Kale Salad, whole Herb Roasted Chicken, Asparagus & Peas side and Panna Cotta for dessert.  Il Bracco’s pastas are excellent and the Spicy Gemelli for four people can be added for $40. You can also purchase a Mimosa kit and wine such as Nickel & Nickel’s “Truchard” for a few extra coins.

Asian Mint has created easy to prepare at home meal kits featuring some of their most popular dishes.  For Mother’s Day the Preston Forest (only) location is selling kits that include Edamommy (sorry, Edamame) Asian Noodle Salas, Shrimp and Chicken Basil with Jasmine Rice and Chocolate Flourless Cake. A 48-hour pre-order is required and you can order online at

LeGourmet Baking has the best shortbread in town.

LeGourmet Baking Becky Nelson’s Lover’s Lane bakery is still cranking out the best shortbread in town.  Her Mother’s Day gift tins are adorable and a perfect gift to drop off to let a certain someone know you are thinking about her. (PS – she does very cute school-themed cookies, too. Maybe a certain graduate needs some shortbread love, too.

Dinner for four costs $75.

Central Market has you covered for Mother’s Day.

Central Market has been a bright spot in an otherwise difficult time.  From the organization of their stores to the fantastic supply of the best produce, meat, seafood, flour, yeast, and TP, they have been a source of comfort for so many during this pandemic.   They are also going to make your Mother’s Day shopping easier with their Meals to Go. To order and schedule pick up, click HERE. Offerings include breakfast in bed set ups, lunch, dinner and everything between.  The little brunch set up pictured here looks great.

Whatever you decide, treat your mamma right. It’s a hard job that doesn’t pay well. 🙂